Tradition Rules at Giuseppe Quintarelli (by Paolo Tenti)

This hard-to-find Valpolicella estate is worth discovering, explains Paolo Tenti.
© Paolo Tenti/Quintarelli | Francesco is following in the footsteps of his grandfather, making dried grape wines
When wine lovers hear the name “Quintarelli,” they immediately think of Amarone. The association is understandable: Quintarelli’s famed bottlings are among Italy’s most sought-after wines, even if the family firm has never done any marketing or promotion. There’s not even a sign at the entrance to the estate. Yet the wines have attained cult status.

Read the article: Tradition Rules at Giuseppe Quintarelli

Le Marche Travel Guide

Le Marche is a microcosm of everything tourists love about Italy—breathtaking landscapes, medieval architecture and terrific wine and food—minus the crowds.

Sandwiched between Emilia Romagna and a sliver of Tuscany to the north, and Abruzzo and Lazio to the south, Le Marche, (pronounced lay MAR-kay) shares the Apennines with Umbria on its west and stretches east to the Adriatic Sea.

Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Villa Bucci Riserva

Often translated as “the Marches,” this Central Italian region has it all. Pristine beaches and rugged shorelines hug the sapphire-blue Adriatic. Rolling hills lie covered with vines and olive groves. There are well-preserved medieval towns and cultural centers, wonderful cuisine and great wines.

What you won’t find are the throngs of tourists that descend regularly on Tuscany, situated on the opposite coast, although crowds do show up at the main beaches in peak season.

Read the article: Le Marche Travel Guide

2009 Brunello di Montalcino: Enjoy Soon

My tasting of the 2009 vintage revealed that it was another challenging year in Montalcino, and the main problem was the weather. Scorching summer temperatures and a lack of rain dominated crucial phases of the growing season. As a result, most wines are prematurely evolved, and while this makes the best wines enjoyable now, many ’09s deliver sensations of cooked fruit, evident alcohol, low acidity and fleeting tannins. Others have more acidity, but dried-up fruit and aggressive, astringent tannins. And there are many styles in between, ranging from soft and sexy to lean and mean. The one trait that distinguishes almost all the 2009s is a lack of ageworthy structure—unusual for wines that are famous for racy acidity and bracing tannins that need years to tame.

Read the article: 2009 Brunello di Montalcino: Enjoy Soon

Sip and turn a page (by Eric Asimov)

Among the world’s great wine regions, the Piedmont in northwestern Italy, home of Barolo and Barbaresco, has lagged far behind in focused English language appraisals. Kerin O’Keefe’s “Barolo and Barbaresco: The King and Queen of Italian Wine” (University of California Press, $39.95) goes a long way to fill the void. O’Keefe, an American wine critic who lives in Italy, offers a comprehensive look at the history, geography, geology and issues faced in the Piedmont, and opinionated profiles of the producers she feels are the best and most important.

O’Keefe, who wrote a similar guide to Brunello di Montalcino in 2012, is thorough and authoritative. She is a critic in the best sense of the word, not shy with her opinions, which she offers without polemics or bluster. This book is not for novices; readers are expected to have an understanding of how wine is farmed and produced. But for those who have delved into Barolo and Barbaresco and want to know more about where the wines are made, the people who make them and the differences in terroirs, this book is inspiring and essential.

Read the review: http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20141217/sip-and-turn-a-page-with-these-books