Traveling Back in Time With Nebbiolo

On November 18th, I traveled in a virtual time machine: a vertical tasting of 8 Nebbiolo-based wines from Alto Piemonte from 1842 to 1970.

© Assaggio a Nordovest | Kerin O’Keefe contemplating a historic Nebbiolo

The tasting, called Assaggio a nordovest (a tasting of northwest) – was organized by the Associazione Vignaioli Colline Biellesi and took place at the stunning Villa Era on the outskirts of Biella in northern Piedmont. I was also honored to participate in the tasting by providing historical background on the area’s long winemaking tradition for the other attendees.

Besides the sheer wonder of trying such old wines, the tasting offered a potent reminder that wines – especially fine wines destined to age and develop for years if not decades – are undeniably alive. It also offered a rare glimpse into how Piedmont’s winemaking has evolved over the last 175 years.

© Assaggio a Nordovest | Nebbiolo-based wines from Alto Piemonte from 1842–1970

Most importantly, the tasting demonstrated the greatness of Nebbiolo from this unique growing area. The wines all hailed from the Biella hills, where ancient, yellow marine sands, and the vicinity to Alpine foothills – where marked day and night temperature swings prolong the growing season – yield intense, fragrant and mineral-driven Nebbiolos boasting vibrant acidity and firm, refined tannins.

Read the full article: Traveling Back in Time With Nebbiolo

It’s Time to Take A Fresh Look at Lambrusco

Looking for a dry, crisp and savory wine that pairs with just about any dish on the planet or makes an excellent aperitif? Then look for Lambrusco. Yes, Lambrusco. Once known as the cheap and cheerful, fizzy plonk served with ice cubes, today’s top Lambruscos are a far cry from the industrially made, cloyingly sweet versions that flooded into the US in the 1980s.

Hailing from the Emilia-Romagna region, Lambrusco is made from the eponymous red grape. Or to be exact, from the extended family of varieties grouped together under the Lambrusco category, although only a handful of the individual vines yield quality wines.

Formerly loved and then scorned for its candied sweetness, these days a number of producers make distinct, slightly sparkling Lambruscos that should be on every wine lover’s radar. But buyer beware: styles vary tremendously and include lightweight, sweet and semi-sweet wines, but the best Lambruscos are dry, crisp, polished and incredibly delicious. They are also extremely well priced. Here are the ones to look for.

Read the full article: http://www.winemag.com/2017/10/18/its-time-to-take-a-fresh-look-at-lambrusco/

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Alto Piemonte: the “Other” Nebbiolo

© Kerin O'Keefe | Christoph Kunzli of Le Piane in his vineyard in Boca
© Kerin O’Keefe | Christoph Kunzli of Le Piane in his vineyard in Boca

If you’re a fan of Nebbiolo – the sole grape behind Barolo and Barbaresco – you’ll love the radiant, mineral-driven Nebbiolos and Nebbiolo-based offerings from Alto Piemonte.

© Paolo Tenti | Cinzia Travaglini in one of her vineyards in Gattinara
© Paolo Tenti | Cinzia Travaglini in one of her vineyards in Gattinara

Vibrant and loaded with finesse, the best are drop-dead gorgeous, possessing age-worthy structures and impeccable balance. And if warmer temperatures and drier summers are pushing alcohol levels to the extreme in other areas, vineyard altitudes, cooler temperatures and highly acidic soils in Alto Piemonte make it rare to find wines above 14% abv.

© Kerin O'Keefe | Paolo De Marchi with some of his Proprietà Sperino bottles
© Kerin O’Keefe | Paolo De Marchi with some of his Proprietà Sperino bottles

Located at the foothills of the northern Piedmont Alps, the most exciting wines come from five small growing areas: Lessona, Gattinara, Ghemme, Boca and Bramaterra that lend their names to the wines.

 

 

A bottle of 1921 Lessona Sella, tasted during a Master Class at Vinitaly 2017
A bottle of 1921 Lessona Sella, tasted during a Master Class at Vinitaly 2017

The wines are steeped in history: in the late 1800s, Alto Piemonte boasted almost 45,000 hectares (111,197 acres) of vineyards, most of them now long gone. Reds made with Nebbiolo (locally called Spanna) – often blended with other local grapes, like Vespolina and Uva Rara – were already imported to the US in the latter half of the 19th century, decades before anyone had heard of Barolo or Barbaresco.

© Kerin O'Keefe | large Slavonian casks at Proprietà Sperino
© Kerin O’Keefe | Large Slavonian casks at Proprietà Sperino

 Then, in the early 1900s, after outbreaks of devastating vine diseases and a catastrophic hailstorm in 1905 destroyed entire vineyards, growers abandoned agriculture en masse to work in the booming textile mills in the nearby city of Biella.

Thanks to a few brave producers, Alto Piemonte is now undergoing a full-blown Renaissance.

 

Read the full article here: http://www.winemag.com/2017/05/08/learn-about-italys-secret-nebbiolos/

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